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‘Bee Scene’ This Summer!

Help Find The UK’s Bee-Friendly Flowers

May 27 2016

This Summer May Bank Holiday, families are being encouraged to get outside with their children and help track down the country’s most bee-friendly flowers.

Plantlife is bringing back ‘Bee Scene’, a hugely important campaign that encourages families to explore their countryside or parks and record ‘bee-friendly’ wildflowers around them.

The initiative, sponsored by pioneering organic cereal maker Nature’s Path - which stepped in after the National Lottery withdrew funding - provides packs and educational tools to help children learn about wildflowers in their local area and spot the ones loved by the humble bumble bee.

From foxgloves and dandelions, to nettles and clovers, Bee Scene encourages families to identify 15 bee-friendly wildflowers using an interactive colour key. They then learn more about why the bumblebee is in decline, their role as cross-pollinators and how we can help save them.

By recording the wildflowers in an area, children will join over 30,000 who’ve already taken part in Bee Scene since its launch in 2010. Participants upload the results onto a virtual meadow map and discover where in the UK is the most bee-friendly.

Bee Scene will be running from May Bank Holiday Weekend and throughout the summer. For further information on how to get involved and all downloadable activity packs, visit plantlife.org.uk/beescene.

As an organic-only company that depends upon the natural pollination of crops for all of its products, Nature’s Path is a perfect partner for the initiative. Founded in 1985 by Arran and Ratana Stephens, Nature’s Path is still family-owned today. Arran was inspired by his father Rupert who told him to care for the land and “Always leave the soil better than you found it.”

In North America, Nature’s Path is actively involved in opposing GMO foods and constantly pursues the goal of sustainable development. You can follow them on Twitter via @NaturesPathUK.